How did Kenya become part of the British Empire?

The Colony and Protectorate of Kenya was established on 23 July 1920 when the territories of the former East Africa Protectorate (except those parts of that Protectorate over which His Majesty the Sultan of Zanzibar had sovereignty) were annexed by the UK.

When did Kenya become part of the British Empire?

British Kenya (1920-1963) Pre-Crisis Phase (July 23, 1920-September 25, 1952): Kenya, which was part of the British East Africa Protectorate, was declared a British colony on July 23, 1920. Major-General Sir Edward Northey was appointed as the first Governor of the British colony of Kenya.

Why did the British take over Kenya?

Kenya was colonized by Great Britain between 1901 and 1960. British settlers, who came to Kenya because of its resources and comfortable climate, forced indigenous farmers and herders onto infertile land or made them work on European-owned farms and plantations.

How did Britain get Kenya?

The Kenya Protectorate was established on 13 August 1920 when the territories of the former East Africa Protectorate which were not annexed by the UK were established as a British Protectorate. … The colonial government duly tightened the measures to force more Kenyans to become low-paid wage-labourers on settler farms.

What did the British Empire do to Kenya?

Not only did the British spend an estimated £55 million suppressing the uprising, they also carried out massacres of civilians, forced several hundred thousand Kenyans into concentration camps, and suspended civil liberties in some cities.

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Why did the British colonize Africa?

The British wanted to control South Africa because it was one of the trade routes to India. However, when gold and diamonds were discovered in the 1860s-1880s their interest in the region increased. … British rule made their country increasingly a country of industry and business.

Why is Kenya called Kenya?

Kenya is named after a mountain of the same name. The Kikuyu people, who lived around present day Mt Kenya, referred to it as “Kirinyaga” or “Kerenyaga”, meaning mountain of whiteness because of its snow-capped peak. … However, the name ‘Kenya” arose out of the inability of the British to pronounce Kirinyaga correctly.